Why to Consider an Independent Primary Care Physician

Independent Primary Care Physicians

 

Patients have been comforted into a costly daze allowing reimbursement policies to govern their decisions in managing their health.  Meanwhile, reliant on reimbursement revenue for survival, physicians may continuously reshape care delivery to mirror the ever-shifting values of payers.

 

This period of medicine is drawing quickly to a close.  As consumers shoulder the growing burden of healthcare costs, America is waking up to the reality of an apparent oxymoron.  With deductibles ballooning to thousands of dollars, most working-age Americans are now insured, self-pay patients.

 

For primary care physicians, in particular, this new reality creates an extremely important for in the road. Consumers hate the old, payer-driven model of primary care.  Now that they are footing the bill, they will seek out and buy what they actually want from doctors who equip themselves to provide it.

 

There are three demands that are all within the reach of any PCP:

  1. Patients are sick and tired of wasting time.  Successful PCPs will shift resources from burdensome billing and collections overhead to technology-enabled customer service.
  2. Patients are sick and tired of blindly purchasing medical services only later to be shell-shocked by the staggering bill.
  3. Patients are sick and tired of being sick and tired.  More specifically, they are no longer content to submit to the delusion of health held tenuously together by an expensive fistful of pills.

 

A practitioner that is fully trained and committed to treating the causes rather than the effects of their health condition is exactly what the new consumer is looking for.

 

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