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THRIVE is a collaborative platform of conventional, integrative, & functional medicine practitioners coming together in one setting to provide personalized healthcare to clients.
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Functional and Integrative Medicine

Thrive Carolinas / Functional and Integrative Medicine

Suggestions for Better Sleep

Suggestions for Better Sleep Courtesy of the Institute of Functional Medicine  MINIMIZE OR AVOID STIMULANTS Avoid alcohol within 3 hours of bedtime. Avoid caffeine-containing beverages or foods after 2 pm; if sensitive to caffeine, avoid it after 12 noon. Avoid Sudafed or other decongestant cold medicines at night. Some medications may have stimulating effects. Complete any aerobic exercise before 6 pm.   NIGHTTIME TENSION AND ANXIETY Avoid anxiety-provoking activities close to bedtime. Avoid watching the news before going to bed. Avoid reading stimulating, exciting materials in bed. Avoid paying bills before bed. Avoid checking your financial reports or the stock market before bedtime. Avoid arguments before bedtime. Try to achieve some action plan or resolution of a discussion or argument before trying to go to sleep. Avoid repeated negative...

Lifestyle Measures to Improve Insulin Sensitivity

Whether you suffer from type 2 diabetes or are afraid your body is becoming insulin resistant, there are some lifestyle changes you can make to address your insulin levels. Exercise, dietary changes, and reducing stress can improve your insulin sensitivity.   Workouts and Insulin Levels   Regular exercise is perhaps the best way to regulate insulin levels. When you exercise, your body moves sugar into muscles for storage, leading to less insulin resistance. Depending on the type of exercise, workouts can improve insulin levels for 24-48 hours after you finish your workout. Cardiovascular exercise has been found to moderate insulin levels. A 2008 study found 60 minutes of cycling increases whole-body insulin sensitivity for 12-24 hours after the workout ends.   While any exercise is helpful in addressing insulin, a 2019...

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A Functional Approach to Autoimmune Disease

Autoimmune disease is the most common medical condition managed in our healthcare system, ahead of heart disease and cancer. In fact, 1 in 5 Americans suffers from some form of autoimmune condition yet it hardly gets the recognition it deserves. There are over 100 known autoimmune conditions and a significant number of them have increased over the past ten years. For example, Crohn’s Disease, an inflammatory condition of the bowel, has increased as much as 300%. An NIH study done in April of 2020 showed that an increasing number of people have a positive ANA, signaling autoimmunity. In the study, they took blood samples of 14,211 individuals who were 12 and older and found that in 1988-1991 the incidence of positive ANA was 11%. This number rose...

Functional Medicine is Designed for the 21st Century Patient

Functional Medicine is Designed for the 21st Century Patient If you are standing on a tack no amount of aspirin or pain medication will make the discomfort of the tack completely disappear. The medicine will only subdue the pain temporarily.  You must remove the tack to allow the discomfort to abate. If you are standing on two tacks removing only one is not enough to make you feel better. You must address both triggers to be completely free of the pain. Functional Medicine does this. Unfortunately, our current medical system addresses disease just this way. Instead of getting to the root cause of a problem, symptoms are simply treated with disregard for what is causing the problem in the first place. When a disease process has multiple symptoms...

What Questions To Ask Your Functional Medicine Provider?

Questions for Functional Medicine Practitioners Is getting to the root cause of your health issue a goal of yours? Our Functional Providers are all certified by the Institute of Functional Medicine and believe in delivering a whole-health approach towards healing. If you're interested in becoming a patient of Thrive's or consulting with a functional medicine provider here are some questions that you may consider asking a clinician who practices Functional Medicine: How would you describe your practice? Do you work with other clinicians – Nutrition Professionals, Health Coach, etc.? Do you have any information you could send me about your practice? Do you have experience treating my condition(s)? Please describe your Functional Medicine training. Do you take insurance? Or are you a cash practice? What are the main...

Food Diversity can Help Optimize Health

Nancy A. Palermo MD As we begin to learn more about the impact of our gut health, we realize we may only be as healthy as our gut. Our gut microbiome, the microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoa living in our digestive tract, appears to play a significant role in our metabolism, immune and neuroendocrine responses. Roles of the microbiome include nutrient and mineral absorption, synthesis of important enzymes, vitamins, and amino acids, and production of 70% of our neurotransmitters, like serotonin and melatonin. Our gut bacteria are also responsible for producing compounds called short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Science shows SCFAs are the drivers of gut health. They appear to improve the gut environment by helping commensal or good bacteria grow. SCFAs repair intestinal permeability, referred to as “leaky...

A Functional Medicine Approach to Allergies

Article Courtesy of Institute of Functional Medicine As a result of an underlying immunological issue, allergic and atopic diseases increase the inflammatory burden and put patients at risk for developing other conditions. With health resilience playing a crucial role in the outcome of disease, treating the underlying causes of atopic diseases may strengthen the immune system response. As seasonal irritants like pollen begin to emerge, patients may be experiencing allergy symptoms that could be confused for more serious illness and might prevent the immune system from mounting a robust response to novel infections. Atopic diseases are the leading reason for clinic visits as well as for emergency room and hospital visits, and they are the most common childhood chronic condition. Commonly known as an “atopic march,” allergy-related...

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Chronobiology: The Dynamic Field of Rhythm and Clock Genes

Article Courtesy of The Institute of Functional Medicine Chronobiology & Circadian Medicine Chronobiology is the study of biologic rhythms, including circadian rhythms, that follow a daily or ~24-hour cycle. Sleeping at night and being awake during the day is an example of a circadian rhythm related to light. In this instance, the daily light and dark cycle is an important zeitgeber, or natural time cue that influences the circadian pattern.1 Our internal biological clocks produce circadian rhythms that are regulated through clock genes and are involved in the essential functioning of both central and peripheral tissues.1,2 Specifically, to modulate various body processes, core clock genes known as period and cryptochrome genes are believed to act as transcriptional regulators that affect the circadian expression of certain rhythmically expressed genes and...